The second largest Buddhist monastery in Mongolia, the ‘Monastery of tranquil felicity’, is located near the Selenge River. The Manchu empire Yongzheng built the monastery between 1727 and 1737, and dedicated it to Zanabazar, Mongolia’s first Bogd Gegeen (sacred king who ruled the country by the Buddhist teachings) and a famous artist and the inventor of the vertical Mongolian script. His mummified body was moved here in 1779. Amarbayasgalant Monastery is one of the few monasteries in Mongolia to survive from the purge of the 1930’s. Restoration of this historic site began in 1975, and was completed in 1998. The nearby Burengiin mountain range and surrounding fields of grass and wildflowers make this monastery is one of the most attractive destination in Mongolia.

Known as “The Dark Blue Pearl”, Lake Khuvsgul is Mongolia's largest and deepest pure lake. Located in the northernmost province, it is the largest tributary stream of Lake Baikal in Russia. Lake Khuvsgul is 136 km long, 36 km wide, 262 meters (for known measurement) deep and is located at an altitude of 1645 m above sea level and is frozen from January until April or May. It's the second largest fresh water lake in Central Asia. It's inhabited by nine species of fish including the Siberian grayling and lenok. Fishing and sport fishing are becoming popular in the lake area. Taiga (deep forest) Fauna and Flora, Tsaatan or known as reindeer herder, practicing reindeer breeding are the main attractions for tourist. Different ethnic groups live in the area: Khalh, Darhadt, Buryat. Tsaatans reindeer herders are lived. Lake Khuvsgul is on the important migration route for birds from Siberia, thus facilitating marvelous opportunities for bird watching.

Not far from Khuvsgul Lake, the Tsaatan people, named from the Mongolian word for reindeer herders live in the taiga. Their entire existence is based around the reindeer, which provide milk, fur for clothes, transport and, occasionally and meat. The Tsaatan are part of a Tuvan ethnic group, which inhabits the Tuvan Republic of Russia. They are truly nomadic, often moving their small encampments, called ail, every two or three weeks-looking for special types of grass and moss loved by the reindeer. The Tsaatan do not use Mongolian GER, but prefer a hut made by reindeer skin.